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IRS Presents: Five Facts about the Making Work Pay Tax Credit

1. This credit – still available for 2010 – equals 6.2 percent of a taxpayer’s earned income. The maximum credit for a married couple filing a joint return is $800 and $400 for other taxpayers.

2. Eligible self-employed taxpayers can benefit from the credit by evaluating their expected income tax liability and, if they are eligible, by making the appropriate adjustments to the amounts of their estimated tax payments.

3. Taxpayers who fall into any of the following groups during 2010 should review their tax withholding to ensure enough tax is being withheld. Those who should pay particular attention to their withholding include:

  • Married couples with two incomes
  • Individuals with multiple jobs
  • Dependents
  • Pensioners
  • Workers without valid Social Security numbers

Having too little tax withheld could result in potentially smaller refunds or – in limited instances –small balance due rather than an expected refund.

4. The Making Work Pay tax credit is reduced or unavailable for higher-income taxpayers. The reduction in the credit begins at $75,000 of income for single taxpayers and $150,000 for couples filing a joint return.

5. A quick withholding check using the IRS Withholding Calculator on IRS.gov may be helpful for anyone who believes their current withholding may not be right. Taxpayers can also check their withholding by using the worksheets in IRS Publication 919, How Do I Adjust My Tax Withholding?. Adjustments can be made by filing a revised Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate. Pensioners can adjust their withholding by filing Form W-4P, Withholding Certificate for Pension or Annuity Payments.

For more information about this and other key tax provisions of the Recovery Act, visit IRS.gov/recovery.
Links:

YouTube Videos:

Tax Credits and Incentives You Should Know About

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act provides tax incentives for first-time homebuyers, people purchasing new cars, those interested in making their homes more energy efficient, and parents and students paying for college.

Here are six things the IRS wants you to know about ARRA tax incentives for individuals:

First-Time Homebuyer Credit Taxpayers who haven’t owned a principal residence during the past three years prior to the purchase date of a home before Dec. 1 of this year may be eligible to receive a credit of up to $8,000 on an original or amended 2008 tax return. They can also wait and claim the credit on their 2009 return.

New Vehicle Purchase Incentive Qualifying taxpayers can deduct the state and local sales and excise taxes paid on the purchase of new cars, light trucks, motor homes and motorcycles. The deduction per vehicle is limited to the tax on up to $49,500 of the purchase price of each qualifying vehicle and phases out for taxpayers at higher income levels.

Making Work Pay and Withholding The Making Work Pay Credit lowered employees’ tax withholding rates this year and has already put more money into the pockets of wage earners. Self-employed individuals will have an opportunity to claim this credit when they file their 2009 return. Taxpayers who fall into any of the following groups should review their tax withholding rates to ensure enough tax is currently being withheld: multiple job holders, families in which both spouses work, workers who can be claimed as dependents by other taxpayers, workers without a valid social security number, some social security recipients who work and pensioners. Failure to adjust your withholding in these situations could result in potentially smaller refunds or in limited instances may cause you to owe tax rather than receive a refund next year.

Tax Credit for First Four Years of College The American Opportunity Credit can help parents and students pay part of the cost of the first four years of college. The new credit modifies the existing Hope Credit for tax years 2009 and 2010, making it available to a broader range of taxpayers. Eligible taxpayers may qualify for the maximum annual credit of $2,500 per student.

Certain Computer Technology Purchases Allowed for 529 Plans ARRA adds computer technology to the list of college expenses that can be paid for by a qualified tuition program, commonly referred to as a 529 plan. For 2009 and 2010, the law expands the definition of qualified higher education expenses to include expenses for computer technology and equipment or Internet access and related services.

Energy-Efficient Home Improvements The credit for nonbusiness energy-efficient improvements is increased for homeowners who make qualified improvements to existing homes. Qualifying improvements include the addition of insulation, energy-efficient exterior windows and energy-efficient heating and air conditioning systems.

For more information on this and other key tax provisions of the Recovery Act, visit the official IRS Website at IRS.gov/Recovery.

Links:
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009: Information Center
YouTube Videos:
First-Time Homebuyer: English Spanish ASL
Check Your Withholding; Making Work Pay: English ASL
Home Energy Credit: English ASL
Education Credits (Parents): English ASL
General Recovery (ARRA) Message: English Spanish ASL

Making Work Pay Tax Credit – Things to Know

Working taxpayers may be eligible for the Making Work Pay tax credit, a significant tax provision of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. This tax credit means more take-home pay for millions of American workers. Here are five things the IRS wants every taxpayer to know about the Making Work Pay tax credit:

1. This credit — available for tax years 2009 and 2010 — equals 6.2 percent of a taxpayer’s earned income. The maximum credit for a married couple filing a joint return is $800 and $400 for other taxpayers. Most wage earners have been enjoying a boost in their paychecks from this credit since April.

2. Eligible self-employed taxpayers can also benefit from the credit by evaluating their expected income tax liability. If eligible, self-employed taxpayers can make the appropriate adjustments to the amounts of their upcoming estimated tax payments in September and January.

3. Taxpayers who fall into any of the following groups should review their tax withholding to ensure enough tax is being withheld. Those who should pay particular attention to their withholding include:

Married couples with two incomes
Individuals with multiple jobs
Dependents
Pensioners
Social Security recipients who also work
Workers without valid Social Security numbers

Having too little tax withheld could result in potentially smaller refunds or – in limited instances –small balance due rather than an expected refund.

4. The Making Work Pay tax credit is either phased out or unavailable for higher-income taxpayers. The phase out begins at $75,000 for single taxpayers and $150,000 for couples filing a joint return.

5. For those who believe their current withholding is not right for their personal situation, a quick withholding check using the IRS withholding calculator on IRS.gov may be helpful. Taxpayers can also do this by using the worksheets in IRS Publication 919, How Do I Adjust My Withholding? Adjustments can be made by filing a revised Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate. Pensioners can adjust their withholding by filing Form W-4P, Withholding Certificate for Pension or Annuity Payments.

For more information on this and other key tax provisions of the Recovery Act, visit the official IRS Website at IRS.gov/Recovery.
Links:

Publication 919, How Do I Adjust My Withholding?
IRS withholding calculator

Video:
Making Work Pay – General – You Tube video
Making Work Pay – Retirees – You Tube video
Making Work Pay – Married – You Tube video
Audio:

Making Work Pay – General Credit

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