Home » RETIREMENT PLAN (Page 2)

Category Archives: RETIREMENT PLAN

Learn How to Fix Retirement Plan Errors

By Stacie Clifford Kitts, CPA

If your company has a retirement plan, it is likely that at some point a mistake will be made during the course of the plans operation.

For example – Eligible compensation is calculated incorrectly, a payroll run misses the employee contribution deferral, or you forget to timely remit participant contributions to the plan administrator.

When errors occur, its important to make sure you understand how to correct the problem by using the Voluntary Correction Program (“VCP”).

Here is a list of the top ten failures found in the VCP program:

1. Failure to amend the plan for tax law changes by the end of the period required by the law.

This results in a plan failing to operate in accordance with the current law because the plan document has not been amended to affect such change. Currently, the most common law changes that employers have failed to amend their plans for are GUST*, the good faith amendments for EGTRRA** and the Final and Temporary regulations under section 401(a)(9).

2. Failure to follow the plan’s definition of compensation for determining contributions.

Usually, certain types of compensation are excluded, such as bonuses, commissions, or overtime, or certain types of compensation are included where they should have been excluded. This failure can result in participants receiving allocations to their accounts that are either greater than or less than the amount they should have received.

3. Failure to include eligible employees in the plan or the failure to exclude ineligible employees from the plan.

This often occurs in a controlled group situation after a merger or acquisition. Where otherwise eligible employees are excluded, the excluded employees don’t receive an allocation of contributions to which they are entitled. Where ineligible employees are included in the plan, the employer has made additional contributions which it did not need to make to the plan.

4. Failure to satisfy plan loan provisions.

Loan failures often result from the plan sponsor’s failure to withhold loan payments. Where a plan fails to collect loan repayments from participants, the loan is considered defaulted and the participant should be taxed on the loan in the year of default.

5. Impermissible in-service withdrawals.

These requests relate to both defined benefit and contribution plans. The law provides that distributions to participants can be made upon certain events or the attainment of a specific age. This failure involves the circumstance where a distribution is made to a participant where the law or plan terms do not permit a distribution.

6. Failure to satisfy IRC 401(a)(9) minimum distribution rules.

The law requires that a participant receive a distribution when they attain a certain age. This failure involves the plan not making distributions to participants where they have attained the age for required distributions under the law. The law requires that the participant pay an excise tax of 50% on the amount of required distribution if it is not made timely. The Service will, in appropriate cases, waive the excise tax if the plan sponsor requests the waiver in appropriate situations.

7. Employer eligibility failure.

This occurs when an employer adopts a plan that it legally is not permitted to adopt. Common situations are where a government adopts a 401(k) plan or a tax-exempt entity (other than a 501(c)(3) entity or a public educational organization) adopts a 403(b) plan.

8. Failure to pass the ADP/ACP nondiscrimination tests under IRC 401(k) and 401(m).

This failure could result from the employer not using the correct compensation or where the employer excluded eligible employees who elected not to participate in the 401(k) plan.

9. Failure to properly provide the minimum top-heavy benefit or contribution under IRC 416 to non-key employees.

The law requires that if the account balances or accrued benefits of key employees (typically, owners) comprises a substantial portion of the assets of the plan (generally, 60% of plan assets), non-key employees are entitled to receive a minimum benefit or contribution.

10. Failure to satisfy the limits of IRC 415.

Once you have identified an error, you can refer to the following “Fix-It Guides” published by the IRS.

2009 Pension Plan Limits

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service announced cost‑of‑living adjustments applicable to dollar limitations for pension plans and other items for tax year 2009.
Section 415 of the Internal Revenue Code provides for dollar limitations on benefits and contributions under qualified retirement plans. It also requires that the Commissioner annually adjust these limits for cost‑of‑living increases.
Many of the pension plan limitations will change for 2009 because the increase in the cost-of-living index met the statutory thresholds that trigger their adjustment. However, for others, the limitation will remain unchanged. For example, the limitation under Section 402(g)(1) on the exclusion for elective deferrals described in Section 402(g)(3) is increased from $15,500 to $16,500. This limitation affects elective deferrals to Section 401(k) plans and to the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan, among other plans.
Effective Jan. 1, 2009, the limitation on the annual benefit under a defined benefit plan under Section 415(b)(1)(A) is increased from $185,000 to $195,000. For participants who separated from service before Jan. 1, 2009, the limitation for defined benefit plans under Section 415(b)(1)(B) is computed by multiplying the participant’s compensation limitation, as adjusted through 2008, by 1.0530.
The limitation for defined contribution plans under Section 415(c)(1)(A) is increased from $46,000 to $49,000.
The Code provides that various other dollar amounts are to be adjusted at the same time and in the same manner as the dollar limitation of Section 415(b)(1)(A). These dollar amounts and the adjusted amounts are as follows:
The limitation under Section 402(g)(1) on the exclusion for elective deferrals described in Section 402(g)(3) is increased from $15,500 to $16,500.
The annual compensation limit under Sections 401(a)(17), 404(l), 408(k)(3)(C), and 408(k)(6)(D)(ii) is increased from $230,000 to $245,000.
The dollar limitation under Section 416(i)(1)(A)(i) concerning the definition of key employee in a top-heavy plan is increased from $150,000 to $160,000.
The dollar amount under Section 409(o)(1)(C)(ii) for determining the maximum account balance in an employee stock ownership plan subject to a 5‑year distribution period is increased from $935,000 to $985,000, while the dollar amount used to determine the lengthening of the 5‑year distribution period is increased from $185,000 to $195,000.
The limitation used in the definition of highly compensated employee under Section 414(q)(1)(B) is increased from $105,000 to $110,000.
The dollar limitation under Section 414(v)(2)(B)(i) for catch-up contributions to an applicable employer plan other than a plan described in Section 401(k)(11) or Section 408(p) for individuals aged 50 or over is increased from $5,000 to $5,500. The dollar limitation under Section 414(v)(2)(B)(ii) for catch-up contributions to an applicable employer plan described in Section 401(k)(11) or Section 408(p) for individuals aged 50 or over remains unchanged at $2,500.
The annual compensation limitation under Section 401(a)(17) for eligible participants in certain governmental plans that, under the plan as in effect on July 1, 1993, allowed cost‑of‑living adjustments to the compensation limitation under the plan under Section 401(a)(17) to be taken into account, is increased from $345,000 to $360,000.
The compensation amount under Section 408(k)(2)(C) regarding simplified employee pensions (SEPs) is increased from $500 to $550.
The limitation under Section 408(p)(2)(E) regarding SIMPLE retirement accounts is increased from $10,500 to $11,500.
The limitation on deferrals under Section 457(e)(15) concerning deferred compensation plans of state and local governments and tax-exempt organizations is increased from $15,500 to $16,500.
The compensation amounts under Section 1.61‑21(f)(5)(i) of the Income Tax Regulations concerning the definition of “control employee” for fringe benefit valuation purposes is increased from $90,000 to $95,000. The compensation amount under Section 1.61‑21(f)(5)(iii) is increased from $185,000 to $195,000.
The limitation on wages under Section 45A regarding individuals eligible for the Indian employment credit is $40,000 for tax years beginning in 2008 and will increase to $45,000 for tax years beginning in 2009. The termination date of section 45A was recently extended from Dec. 31, 2007, to Dec. 31, 2009, by Section 314 of Division C of the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, P.L. 110-343.
The Code also provides that several pension-related amounts are to be adjusted using the cost-of-living adjustment under Section 1(f)(3). These dollar amounts and the adjustments are as follows:
The adjusted gross income limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(A) for determining the retirement savings contribution credit for married taxpayers filing a joint return is increased from $32,000 to $33,000; the limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(B) is increased from $34,500 to $36,000; and the limitation under Sections 25B(b)(1)(C) and 25B(b)(1)(D), from $53,000 to $55,500.
The adjusted gross income limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(A) for determining the retirement savings contribution credit for taxpayers filing as head of household is increased from $24,000 to $24,750; the limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(B) is increased from $25,875 to $27,000; and the limitation under Sections 25B(b)(1)(C) and 25B(b)(1)(D), from $39,750 to $41,625.
The adjusted gross income limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(A) for determining the retirement savings contribution credit for all other taxpayers is increased from $16,000 to $16,500; the limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(B) is increased from $17,250 to $18,000; and the limitation under Sections 25B(b)(1)(C) and 25B(b)(1)(D), from $26,500 to $27,750.
The applicable dollar amount under Section 219(g)(3)(B)(i) for determining the deductible amount of an IRA contribution for taxpayers who are active participants filing a joint return or as a qualifying widow(er) is increased from $85,000 to $89,000. The applicable dollar amount under Section 219(g)(3)(B)(ii) for all other taxpayers (other than married taxpayers filing separate returns) is increased from $53,000 to $55,000. The applicable dollar amount under Section 219(g)(7)(A) for a taxpayer who is not an active participant but whose spouse is an active participant is increased from $159,000 to $166,000.
The adjusted gross income limitation under Section 408A(c)(3)(C)(ii)(I) for determining the maximum Roth IRA contribution for married taxpayers filing a joint return or for taxpayers filing as a qualifying widow(er) is increased from $159,000 to $166,000. The adjusted gross income limitation under Section 408A(c)(3)(C)(ii)(II) for all other taxpayers (other than married taxpayers filing separate returns) is increased from $101,000 to $105,000.
Administrators of defined benefit or defined contribution plans that have received favorable determination letters should not request new determination letters solely because of yearly amendments to adjust maximum limitations in the plans.

Revenue Ruling 2009-02 provides the covered compensation tables under section 401 of the Code for the year 2009 for use in determining contributions to defined benefit plans and permitted disparity. Revenue Ruling 2009-02 will appear in IRB 2009-2, dated Jan. 12, 2009.

Withholding Adjustment Options for Pension Plans

WASHINGTON — As part of a wider outreach effort to educate taxpayers about the benefits they will receive under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the Internal Revenue Service today released new withholding adjustment procedures for pension plans.

In February, the IRS issued revised withholding tables incorporating the Making Work Pay Tax Credit, one of the key provisions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. That change resulted in more take home pay for more than 120 million American households and provided an immediate economic stimulus. The new procedure for pensions will make withholding more accurate for pension recipients.

While the newly announced procedures apply only to pension payments, the IRS is gearing up for a wider outreach campaign to educate pensioners and other taxpayers about the withholding tables and Recovery payments. The IRS will work with partner groups to provide taxpayers information to make sure they have the appropriate withholding for their situation. The IRS will also work on developing a variety of information products, including brochures, video and audio material to help educate taxpayers.

The change announced today will help some pensioners avoid a smaller refund next spring or even a balance due in limited situations. A wide variety of factors, such as outside jobs and other earned income, can affect how much, if any, withholding is needed by people receiving a pension to satisfy their annual tax liability. The optional adjustment procedure which may be used by those paying pensions is available in Notice 1036-P, Additional Withholding for Pensions for 2009. The on-line version of Publication 15-T, New Wage Withholding and Advance Earned Income Credit Payment Tables, will be updated and available next week.

Pension payors are not required to use this new procedure and may continue to use only the February 2009 withholding tables. For plans that adopt the new procedure, withholding on pension payments will be automatically adjusted with no action needed by pensioners. The IRS is also encouraging pension payors who choose to implement the new withholding adjustment procedures to contact retirees who previously submitted a Form W-4P, Withholding Certificate for Pension or Annuity Payments, requesting additional withholding after the February withholding tables were issued.

Those who should pay particular attention to their withholding include married couples with two incomes, individuals with multiple jobs, dependents, some Social Security recipients who work and workers who do not have valid Social Security Numbers. Depending on their personal situation, some people could have less withheld from their paychecks than they need or want. People who believe their current withholding is not appropriate for their personal situation can perform a quick check by using the IRS withholding calculator on IRS.gov. Any necessary adjustments can be made by filing a revised Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate, with their employer.

For more information visit IRS.gov. Taxpayers and payors can download forms and publications from IRS.gov or request a free copy by calling toll free 1-800-TAX-FORM (1-800-829-3676).

Info About IRA Contributions

There is still time to make contributions to your traditional Individual Retirement Arrangement, better known as an IRA. Below are the top ten things you should know about money you put aside for retirement in an IRA.

You may be able to deduct some or all of your contributions to your IRA and you also may be eligible for a tax credit equal to a percentage of your contribution.

Contributions can be made to your traditional IRA at any time during the year or by the due date for filing your return for that year, not including extensions. For most people, this means contributions for 2008 must be made by April 15, 2009.

The amount of funds in your IRA are generally not taxed until you receive distributions from that IRA.

To figure your deduction for IRA contributions, use the worksheets in the instructions for the form you are filing.

For 2008, the most that can be contributed to your traditional IRA generally is the smaller of the following amounts: $5,000 or the amount of your taxable compensation for the year. Taxpayers who are 50 or older can contribute up to $6,000.

Use Form 8880, Credit for Qualified Retirement Savings Contributions, to determine whether you are also eligible for a tax credit.

You cannot deduct an IRA contribution or claim the Credit for Qualified Retirement Saving Contributions on Form 1040EZ; you must use either Form 1040A or Form 1040.
To contribute to a traditional IRA, you must be under age 70 1/2 at the end of the tax year.
You must have taxable compensation, such as wages, salaries, commissions and tips. If you file a joint return, only one of you needs to have compensation.

Refer to IRS Publication 590, Individual Retirement Arrangements, for information on the amounts you will be eligible to contribute to your IRA account.

Both Form 8880 and Publication 590 can be downloaded at IRS.gov or ordered by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).

IRS Presents Credit for Retirement Savings Contributions

If you make eligible contributions to an employer-sponsored retirement plan or to an individual retirement arrangement, you may be able to take a tax credit.
The Savers Credit, formally known as the Retirement Savings Contributions Credit, applies to individuals with a filing status and income of:
Single with income up to $26,500
Head of Household with income up to $39,750
Married Filing Jointly, with incomes up to $53,000
To be eligible for the credit you must be at least age 18, not a full-time student, and cannot be claimed as a dependent on another person’s return.
If you make eligible contributions to a qualified IRA, 401(k) and certain other retirement plans, you may be able to take a credit of up to $1,000 or up to $2,000 if filing jointly. The credit is a percentage of the qualifying contribution amount, with the highest rate for taxpayers with the least income.
When figuring this credit, you generally must subtract the amount of distributions you have received from your retirement plans from the contributions you have made. This rule applies for distributions starting two years before the year the credit is claimed and ending with the filing deadline for that tax return.
The Retirement Savings Contributions Credit is in addition to other tax benefits which may result from the retirement contributions. For example, most workers at these income levels may deduct all or part of their contributions to a traditional IRA. Contributions to a regular 401(k) plan are not subject to income tax until withdrawn from the plan.
For more information, review IRS Publication 590, Individual Retirement Arrangements, Publication 4703, Retirement Savings Contributions Credit and Form 8880, Credit for Qualified Retirement Savings Contributions. The publications and form can be downloaded at IRS.gov or ordered by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).
Links:
Form 8880, Credit for Qualified Retirement Savings Contributions (PDF 46K)
Form 1040, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return (PDF 176K)
Form 1040A, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return (PDF 136K)
Publication 590, Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs) (PDF 449K)
Tax Topic 610

2008 Pension Plan Limits

IR-2007-171, Oct. 18, 2007

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today announced cost of living adjustments applicable to dollar limitations for pension plans and other items for Tax Year 2008.

Section 415 of the Internal Revenue Code provides for dollar limitations on benefits and contributions under qualified retirement plans. It also requires that the Commissioner annually adjust these limits for cost of living increases.

Many of the pension plan limitations will change for 2008 because the increase in the cost-of-living index met the statutory thresholds that trigger their adjustment. However, for others, the limitation will remain unchanged. For example, the limitation under Section 402(g)(1) on the exclusion for elective deferrals described in Section 402(g)(3) remains unchanged at $15,500. This limitation affects elective deferrals to Section 401(k) plans and to the Federal Government’s Thrift Savings Plan, among other plans.

Effective January 1, 2008, the limitation on the annual benefit under a defined benefit plan under Section 415(b)(1)(A) is increased from $180,000 to $185,000. For participants who separated from service before January 1, 2008, the limitation for defined benefit plans under Section 415(b)(1)(B) is computed by multiplying the participant’s compensation limitation, as adjusted through 2007, by 1.0236.

The limitation for defined contribution plans under Section 415(c)(1)(A) is increased from $45,000 to $46,000.

The Code provides that various other dollar amounts are to be adjusted at the same time and in the same manner as the dollar limitation of Section 415(b)(1)(A). These dollar amounts and the adjusted amounts are as follows:

The limitation under Section 402(g)(1) on the exclusion for elective deferrals described in Section 402(g)(3) remains unchanged at $15,500.

The annual compensation limit under Sections 401(a)(17), 404(l), 408(k)(3)(C), and 408(k)(6)(D)(ii) is increased from $225,000 to $230,000.

The dollar limitation under Section 416(i)(1)(A)(i) concerning the definition of key employee in a top-heavy plan is increased from $145,000 to $150,000.

The dollar amount under Section 409(o)(1)(C)(ii) for determining the maximum account balance in an employee stock ownership plan subject to a 5 year distribution period is increased from $915,000 to $935,000, while the dollar amount used to determine the lengthening of the 5 year distribution period is increased from $180,000 to $185,000.

The limitation used in the definition of highly compensated employee under Section 414(q)(1)(B) is increased from $100,000 to $105,000.

The dollar limitation under Section 414(v)(2)(B)(i) for catch-up contributions to an applicable employer plan other than a plan described in Section 401(k)(11) or Section 408(p) for individuals aged 50 or over remains unchanged at $5,000. The dollar limitation under Section 414(v)(2)(B)(ii) for catch-up contributions to an applicable employer plan described in Section 401(k)(11) or Section 408(p) for individuals aged 50 or over remains unchanged at $2,500.

The annual compensation limitation under Section 401(a)(17) for eligible participants in certain governmental plans that, under the plan as in effect on July 1, 1993, allowed cost of living adjustments to the compensation limitation under the plan under Section 401(a)(17) to be taken into account, is increased from $335,000 to $345,000.

The compensation amount under Section 408(k)(2)(C) regarding simplified employee pensions (SEPs) remains unchanged at $500.

The limitation under Section 408(p)(2)(E) regarding SIMPLE retirement accounts remains unchanged at $10,500.

The limitation on deferrals under Section 457(e)(15) concerning deferred compensation plans of state and local governments and tax-exempt organizations remains unchanged at $15,500.

The compensation amounts under Section 1.61 21(f)(5)(i) of the Income Tax Regulations concerning the definition of “control employee” for fringe benefit valuation purposes remains unchanged at $90,000. The compensation amount under Section 1.61 21(f)(5)(iii) is increased from $180,000 to $185,000.

The Code also provides that several pension-related amounts are to be adjusted using the cost-of-living adjustment under Section 1(f)(3). These dollar amounts and the adjustments are as follows:

The adjusted gross income limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(A) for determining the retirement savings contribution credit for taxpayers filing a joint return is increased from $31,000 to $32,000; the limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(B) is increased from $34,000 to $34,500; and the limitation under Sections 25B(b)(1)(C) and 25B(b)(1)(D), from $52,000 to $53,000.

The adjusted gross income limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(A) for determining the retirement savings contribution credit for taxpayers filing as head of household is increased from $23,250 to $24,000; the limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(B) is increased from $25,500 to $25,875; and the limitation under Sections 25B(b)(1)(C) and 25B(b)(1)(D), from $39,000 to $39,750.

The adjusted gross income limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(A) for determining the retirement savings contribution credit for all other taxpayers is increased from $15,500 to $16,000; the limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(B) is increased from $17,000 to $17,250; and the limitation under Sections 25B(b)(1)(C) and 25B(b)(1)(D), from $26,000 to $26,500.

The applicable dollar amount under Section 219(g)(3)(B)(i) for determining the deductible amount of an IRA contribution for taxpayers who are active participants filing a joint return or as a qualifying widow(er) is increased from $83,000 to $85,000. The applicable dollar amount under Section 219(g)(3)(B)(ii) for all other taxpayers (other than married taxpayers filing separate returns) is increased from $52,000 to $53,000. The applicable dollar amount under Section 219(g)(7)(A) for a taxpayer who is not an active participant but whose spouse is an active participant is increased from $156,000 to $159,000.

The adjusted gross income limitation under Section 408A(c)(3)(C)(ii)(I) for determining the maximum Roth IRA contribution for taxpayers filing a joint return or as a qualifying widow(er) is increased from $156,000 to $159,000. The adjusted gross income limitation under Section 408A(c)(3)(C)(ii)(II) for all other taxpayers (other than married taxpayers filing separate returns) is increased from $99,000 to $101,000.

Administrators of defined benefit or defined contribution plans that have received favorable determination letters should not request new determination letters solely because of yearly amendments to adjust maximum limitations in the plans.

%d bloggers like this: