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Many Business Tax Filers Can File for 2012 Starting Feb. 4 But many others are Looking at late Feb. Early March before they can file

Many businesses will be able to file their 2012 federal income tax returns starting Monday, Feb. 4. Filers of forms affected by January tax law changes will need to wait until late February or early March.

These delay dates impact the release of your electronically prepared returns. They do not prevent Katherman Kitts from preparing your tax return.

Katherman Kitts wants to remind our clients that there is no push back on the March 15 (business filers) and the April 15 (individual filers) due dates for your tax returns. Therefore, we still need enough time to receive the information and to prepare your returns before the filing deadlines. Please, continue to send the information to prepare your returns as soon as possible.

The Monday opening covers non-1040 series business returns for calendar year 2012, including Form 1120 filed by corporations, Form 1120S filed by S corporations, Form 1065 filed by partnerships, Form 990 filed by exempt organizations and most users of Form 720 , Quarterly Excise Tax Return. This includes both electronic filers and paper filers.

While many businesses will be able to file starting Feb. 4, there are a number of business forms still being updated for 2012. The IRS will announce soon when individual and business taxpayers can begin filing returns that include any of the delayed forms. Processing of these forms were delayed while the IRS completes programming and testing of its processing systems to reflect changes made by the American Taxpayer Relief Act (ATRA) enacted by Congress on Jan. 2.
A full list of the affected forms is available on IRS.gov.

In addition to the forms listed on IRS.gov, filing of two other business forms is affected by the delay, but only for electronic filers. Businesses using Form 720 and filling out lines 13 and 14 cannot file yet electronically, but they can file on paper. Other Forms 720 are being accepted electronically. In addition, Form 8849 Schedule 3, Claim for Refund of Excise Taxes, is not currently being accepted electronically, but it can be filed on paper.

Additional information will be posted soon on IRS.gov.

Who Should File a 2012 Tax Return?

If you received income during 2012, you may need to file a tax return in 2013. The amount of your income, your filing status, your age and the type of income you received will determine whether you’re required to file. Even if you are not required to file a tax return, you may still want to file. You may get a refund if you’ve had too much federal income tax withheld from your pay or qualify for certain tax credits.

You can find income tax filing requirements on IRS.gov. The instructions for Forms 1040, 1040A or 1040EZ also list filing requirements. The Interactive Tax Assistant tool, also available on the IRS website, is another helpful resource. The ITA tool answers many of your tax law questions including whether you need to file a return.

Even if you’ve determined that you don’t need to file a tax return this year, you may still want to file. Here are five reasons why:

1. Federal Income Tax Withheld. If your employer withheld federal income tax from your pay, if you made estimated tax payments, or if you had a prior year overpayment applied to this year’s tax, you could be due a refund. File a return to claim any excess tax you paid during the year.

2. Earned Income Tax Credit. If you worked but earned less than $50,270 last year, you may qualify for EITC. EITC is a refundable tax credit; which means if you qualify you could receive EITC as a tax refund. Families with qualifying children may qualify to get up to $5,891 dollars. You can’t get the credit unless you file a return and claim it. Use the EITC Assistant to find out if you qualify.

3. Additional Child Tax Credit. If you have at least one qualifying child and you don’t get the full amount of the Child Tax Credit, you may qualify for this additional refundable credit. You must file and use new Schedule 8812, Child Tax Credit, to claim the credit.

4. American Opportunity Credit. If you or someone you support is a student, you might be eligible for this credit. Students in their first four years of postsecondary education may qualify for as much as $2,500 through this partially refundable credit. Even those who owe no tax can get up to $1,000 of the credit as cash back for each eligible student. You must file Form 8863, Education Credits, and submit it with your tax return to claim the credit.

5. Health Coverage Tax Credit. If you’re receiving Trade Adjustment Assistance, Trade Adjustment Assistance, Alternative Trade Adjustment Assistance or pension benefit payments from the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, you may be eligible for a 2012 Health Coverage Tax Credit. Spouses and dependents may also be eligible. If you’re eligible, you can receive a 72.5 percent tax credit on payments you made for qualified health insurance premiums.
Want more information about filing requirements and tax credits? Visit IRS.gov.

Additional IRS Resources:
• Interactive Tax Assistant
• EITC Assistant
• Publication 596, Earned Income Credit
• Schedule 8812, Child Tax Credit
• Publication 972, Child Tax Credit
• Form 8863, Education Credits
• Publication 970, Tax Benefits for Education
• Health Coverage Tax Credit
IRS YouTube Videos:
• Do I Have To File a Tax Return? – English | Spanish | ASL
• Education Tax Credits and Deductions – English | Spanish | ASL
IRS Podcasts:
• Education Tax Credits and Deductions – English | Spanish

Extension Due Dates Change

IR-2008-84, June 30, 2008
WASHINGTON — Internal Revenue Service officials today announced a change in the extended due date on certain business returns to help individuals better meet their filing obligations. The change, which reduces the extension period from six to five months, eases the burden on taxpayers who must report information from Schedules K-1 and similar documents on their individual tax returns.
Income, deductions and credits from partnerships, S corporations, estates and trusts are reported to partners, investors and beneficiaries on Schedules K-1 and other similar statements. The recipients then use that information to complete their own tax returns.
Currently, the extended due date for both businesses and individuals often falls on the same date, generally Oct. 15. This creates a burden for individual taxpayers who rely on the information from Schedule K-1 and other similar statements to prepare and file their personal tax returns in a timely manner.

“We are eliminating the same-day deadline for these returns, which causes needless hardship and puts the individual taxpayer in an awkward position,” said IRS Commissioner Doug Shulman. “We want to correct this timing issue to ensure that all taxpayers have the information they need to file timely and stay in compliance with the law.”

The IRS today issued temporary and proposed regulations that will reduce the extension of time to file tax returns for certain businesses that generate Schedules K-1 and other similar statements from six months to five. Requiring these statements to be issued one month earlier, generally by Sept. 15, will provide recipients time to prepare and file returns within the extended time frames.
This change will be effective for extension requests with respect to tax returns due on or after Jan. 1, 2009, and applies to business entities that file the following returns and forms that have a tax year ending on or after Sept. 30, 2008:
Form 1065, U.S.Return of Partnership Income
Form 1041, U.S. Income Tax Return for Estates & Trusts
Form 8804, Annual Return for Partnership Withholding Tax (Section 1446)
The regulation does not change the process for requesting an extension of time to file, nor does it affect extensions of time to file other types of business returns, such as those used by S corporations.
“The regulations will bring the extended time frames of certain business entities with flow-through items in line with other similar businesses, such as S corporations,” said Jodi Patterson, director of IRS’s Office of Taxpayer Burden Reduction. “S corporations have a return due date of March 15 and, under a regular 6-month extension of time to file, their extended due date already falls on September 15.”
The IRS initiated the proposal to reduce the extension of time to file, carefully weighing the impact on partnerships and other affected entities against the burden the existing deadline puts on individuals, who need this information to file timely and accurate returns.
Comments on the proposed regulations can be sent electronically via the Federal eRulemaking Portal at http://www.regulations.gov/ (IRS REG-115457-08). For further information on commenting on the proposed regulations, see REG-115457-08.
The IRS is committed to reducing unnecessary taxpayer burden and welcomes input from tax and payroll professionals, business owners and the general public on opportunities to make it easier to comply with the tax laws. More information, including a link to Form 13285A, Reducing Tax Burden on America’s Taxpayers, can be found on the TBR page of IRS.gov, Office of Taxpayer Burden Reduction
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