IRS Tax Tip 2014-60: Ten Things to Know about IRS Notices and Letters

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IRS Tax Tips April 22, 2014

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IRS Tax Tip 2014-59: Unpaid Debt Can Affect Your Refund

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IRS Tax Tips April 21, 2014

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IR-2014-55: Sign Up Now for the 2014 IRS Nationwide Tax Forums and Save Money

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IRS Newswire April 18, 2014

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IRS Tax Tip 2014-58: Tips for Taxpayers Who Missed the Tax Deadline

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IRS Tax Tips April 18, 2014

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IR-2014-54: As the Tax Season ends, IRS answers: Where’s My Refund?

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IRS Newswire April 17, 2014

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HCTT-2014-13: Find out if You Qualify for a Health Insurance Coverage Exemption

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IRS Tax Tips April 17, 2014

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IRS Tax Tip 2014-57: Options for Taxpayers Who Owe Taxes

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IRS Tax Tip 2014-56: Eight Facts about Penalties for Filing and Paying Late

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IRS Tax Tips April 16, 2014

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IRS Tax Tip 2014-55: Ten Tips for Paying Your Taxes

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IRS Tax Tips April 15, 2014

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IRS Special Edition Tax Tip 2014-10: IRS Renews Phone Scam Warning

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IRS Tax Tips April 14, 2014

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IR-2014-53: IRS Reiterates Warning of Pervasive Telephone Scam

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IRS Newswire April 14, 2014

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IRS Tax Tip 2014-54: What You Should Know about the Additional Medicare Tax

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IRS Tax Tips April 14, 2014

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IR-2014-52: IRS Reminds Those with Foreign Assets of U.S. Tax Obligations

IR-2014-52, April 11, 2014
WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service reminds U.S. citizens and resident aliens, including those with dual citizenship who have lived or worked abroad during all or part of 2013, that they may have a U.S. tax liability and a filing requirement in 2014.
The filing deadline is Monday, June 16, 2014, for U.S. citizens and resident aliens living overseas, or serving in the military outside the U.S. on the regular due date of their tax return. Eligible taxpayers get one additional day because the normal June 15 extended due date falls on Sunday this year. To use this automatic two-month extension, taxpayers must attach a statement to their return explaining which of these two situations applies. See U.S. Citizens and Resident Aliens Abroad for details.
Nonresident aliens who received income from U.S. sources in 2013 also must determine whether they have a U.S. tax obligation. The filing deadline for nonresident aliens can be April 15 or June 16 depending on sources of income. See Taxation of Nonresident Aliens on IRS.gov.
Federal law requires U.S. citizens and resident aliens to report any worldwide income, including income from foreign trusts and foreign bank and securities accounts. In most cases, affected taxpayers need to fill out and attach Schedule B to their tax return. Certain taxpayers may also have to fill out and attach to their return Form 8938, Statement of Foreign Financial Assets.
Part III of Schedule B asks about the existence of foreign accounts, such as bank and securities accounts, and usually requires U.S. citizens to report the country in which each account is located.
Generally, U.S. citizens, resident aliens and certain nonresident aliens must report specified foreign financial assets on Form 8938 if the aggregate value of those assets exceeds certain thresholds. See the instructions for this form for details.
Separately, taxpayers with foreign accounts whose aggregate value exceeded $10,000 at any time during 2013 must file electronically with the Treasury Department a Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) Form 114, Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR). This form replaces TD F 90-22.1, the FBAR form used in the past. It is due to the Treasury Department by June 30, 2014, must be filed electronically and is only available online through the BSA E-Filing System website. For details regarding the FBAR requirements, see Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR).
Taxpayers abroad can now use IRS Free File to prepare and electronically file their returns for free. This means both U.S. citizens and resident aliens living abroad with adjusted gross incomes (AGI) of $58,000 or less can use brand-name software to prepare their returns and then e-file them for free. A second option, Free File Fillable Forms the electronic version of IRS paper forms, has no income limit and is best suited to people who are comfortable preparing their own tax return. Check out the e-file link on IRS.gov for details on the various electronic filing options.
A limited number of companies provide software that can accommodate foreign addresses. To determine which will work best, view the complete Free File Software list and the services provided. Both e-file and Free File are available until Oct. 15, 2014, for anyone filing a 2013 return.
Any U.S. taxpayer here or abroad with tax questions can use the online IRS Tax Map and the International Tax Topic Index to get answers. These online tools assemble or group IRS forms, publications and web pages by subject and provide users with a single entry point to find tax information.
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Page Last Reviewed or Updated: 11-Apr-2014

IR-2014-51: IRS Debunks Frivolous Tax Arguments

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today released the 2014 version of “The Truth about Frivolous Tax Arguments.” The document describes and responds to some of the common frivolous tax arguments made by those who oppose compliance with federal tax laws. The cases cited demonstrate how frivolous arguments are treated by the IRS and the courts. The 2014 version includes numerous recently decided cases that demonstrate that the courts continue to regard such arguments as illegitimate.
Examples of frivolous arguments include contentions that taxpayers can refuse to pay income taxes on religious or moral grounds by invoking the First Amendment; that the only “employees” subject to federal income tax are employees of the federal government; and that only foreign-source income is taxable.
Frivolous arguments appeared on the IRS annual “Dirty Dozen” list of tax scams that was released on February 19.
Promoters of frivolous schemes encourage taxpayers to make unreasonable and outlandish claims to avoid paying the taxes they owe. While taxpayers have the right to contest their tax liabilities, no one has the right to disobey the law or disregard their responsibility to pay taxes. The penalty for filing a frivolous tax return is $5,000. The penalty is applied to anyone who submits a tax return or other specified submission, if any portion of the submission is based on a position the IRS identifies as frivolous.
Those who promote or adopt frivolous positions also risk a variety of other penalties. For example, taxpayers could be responsible for an accuracy-related penalty, a civil fraud penalty, an erroneous refund claim penalty or a failure to file penalty. The Tax Court may also impose a penalty against taxpayers who make frivolous arguments in court.
Taxpayers who rely on frivolous arguments and schemes may also face criminal prosecution for attempting to evade or defeat tax. Similarly, taxpayers may be convicted of a felony for willfully making and signing under penalties of perjury any return, statement or other document that the person does not believe to be true and correct as to every material matter.
Persons who promote frivolous arguments and those who assist taxpayers in claiming tax benefits based on frivolous arguments may be prosecuted for a criminal felony.
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IRS Tax Tip 2014-53: Four Tips If You Can’t Pay Your Taxes on Time

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IRS Tax Tips April 11, 2014

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