In Case You Missed It-Standard Mileage Rates for 2013

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service issued the 2013 optional standard mileage rates used to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile for business, charitable, medical or moving purposes.

Beginning on Jan. 1, 2013, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car (also vans, pickups or panel trucks) will be:

56.5 cents per mile for business miles driven.
24 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes.
14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations.

The rate for business miles driven during 2013 increases 1 cent from the 2012 rate. The medical and moving rate is also up 1 cent per mile from the 2012 rate.

The standard mileage rate for business is based on an annual study of the fixed and variable costs of operating an automobile. The rate for medical and moving purposes is based on the variable costs.

Taxpayers always have the option of calculating the actual costs of using their vehicle rather than using the standard mileage rates.

A taxpayer may not use the business standard mileage rate for a vehicle after using any depreciation method under the Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS) or after claiming a Section 179 deduction for that vehicle. In addition, the business standard mileage rate cannot be used for more than four vehicles used simultaneously.

These and other requirements for a taxpayer to use a standard mileage rate to calculate the amount of a deductible business, moving, medical, or charitable expense are in Rev. Proc. 2010-51. Notice 2012-72 contains the standard mileage rates, the amount a taxpayer must use in calculating reductions to basis for depreciation taken under the business standard mileage rate, and the maximum standard automobile cost that a taxpayer may use in computing the allowance under a fixed and variable rate plan.

IRS Announces 2012 Standard Mileage Rates, Most Rates Are the Same as in July

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today issued the 2012 optional standard mileage rates used to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile for business, charitable, medical or moving purposes.

Beginning on Jan. 1, 2012, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car (also vans, pickups or panel trucks) will be:

  • 55.5 cents per mile for business miles driven
  • 23 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes
  • 14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations

The rate for business miles driven is unchanged from the mid-year adjustment that became effective on July 1, 2011. The medical and moving rate has been reduced by 0.5 cents per mile.

The standard mileage rate for business is based on an annual study of the fixed and variable costs of operating an automobile. The rate for medical and moving purposes is based on the variable costs as determined by the same study. Independent contractor Runzheimer International conducted the study.

Taxpayers always have the option of calculating the actual costs of using their vehicle rather than using the standard mileage rates.

A taxpayer may not use the business standard mileage rate for a vehicle after using any depreciation method under the Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS) or after claiming a Section 179 deduction for that vehicle. In addition, the business standard mileage rate cannot be used for more than four vehicles used simultaneously.

These and other requirements for a taxpayer to use a standard mileage rate to calculate the amount of a deductible business, moving, medical or charitable expense are in Rev. Proc. 2010-51.

Notice 2012-01 contains the standard mileage rates, the amount a taxpayer must use in calculating reductions to basis for depreciation taken under the business standard mileage rate, and the maximum standard automobile cost that a taxpayer may use in computing the allowance under a fixed and variable rate plan.

Related Item: IR-2011-104, In 2012, Many Tax Benefits Increase Due to Inflation Adjustments

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Page Last Reviewed or Updated: 04-Aug-2012

WooHoo Mileage Rate Increases to 55.5 Cents for Last 6 Months of Year

1910 Model T Ford

Katherman Kitts & Co. LLP Mileage Rates Update

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today announced an increase in the optional standard mileage rates for the final six months of 2011. Taxpayers may use the optional standard rates to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile for business and other purposes.

The rate will increase to 55.5 cents a mile for all business miles driven from July 1, 2011, through Dec. 31, 2011. This is an increase of 4.5 cents from the 51 cent rate in effect for the first six months of 2011, as set forth in Revenue Procedure 2010-51.
In recognition of recent gasoline price increases, the IRS made this special adjustment for the final months of 2011. The IRS normally updates the mileage rates once a year in the fall for the next calendar year.

“This year’s increased gas prices are having a major impact on individual Americans. The IRS is adjusting the standard mileage rates to better reflect the recent increase in gas prices,” said IRS Commissioner Doug Shulman. “We are taking this step so the reimbursement rate will be fair to taxpayers.”

While gasoline is a significant factor in the mileage figure, other items enter into the calculation of mileage rates, such as depreciation and insurance and other fixed and variable costs.

The optional business standard mileage rate is used to compute the deductible costs of operating an automobile for business use in lieu of tracking actual costs. This rate is also used as a benchmark by the federal government and many businesses to reimburse their employees for mileage.

The new six-month rate for computing deductible medical or moving expenses will also increase by 4.5 cents to 23.5 cents a mile, up from 19 cents for the first six months of 2011. The rate for providing services for charitable organizations is set by statute, not the IRS, and remains at 14 cents a mile.

The new rates are contained in Announcement 2011-40 on the optional standard mileage rates.

Taxpayers always have the option of calculating the actual costs of using their vehicle rather than using the standard mileage rates.

Mileage Rate Changes

Purpose Rates 1/1 through 6/30/11    Rates 7/1 through 12/31/11 
Business 51 55.5
  Medical/Moving 19 23.5
Charitable 14 14

2011 Auto Depreciation Deduction Limitations – (and a classic video from The Cars)

By Stacie Clifford Kitts, CPA

Well, I’m a bit late in the posting of this Revenue Procedure released March 1 by the Internal Revenue Service.  But in my defense, we are a tiny bit busy this time of year.

Revenue Procedure 2011-21 provides the depreciation deduction limitations for owners of passenger automobiles (including trucks and vans) first placed in service during calendar year 2011 and the amount to be included in income by lessees of passenger automobiles first leased during calendar year 2011.  These depreciation deduction limitations and income inclusion amounts are updated annually pursuant to section 280F to reflect the automobile price inflation adjustments.  Rev. Proc. 2011-21 also modifies Rev. Proc. 2010-18, to increase the depreciation limitations and lessee inclusion amounts for passenger automobiles first placed in service or leased in 2010 by taxpayers claiming the section 168(k) additional first year depreciation deduction pursuant to the Small Business Jobs Act of 2010.

Revenue Procedure 2011-21 will appear in IRB 2011-12 dated March 21, 2010.

Here is a recap of the depreciation schedules included in the Revenue Procedure.

Depreciation table for passenger automobiles (that are not trucks or vans) placed in service in calendar year 2011 for which the Sec 168(k) additional first year depreciation deduction applies:

1st tax year                           $11,060

2nd tax year                         $4,900

3rd tax year                         $2,950

Each succeeding year      $1,775

Depreciation table for trucks and vans placed in service in calendar year 2011 for which the Sec 168(k) additional first year depreciation applies:

1s tax year                           $11,260

2nd tax year                       $5,200

3rd tax year                        $3,150

Each succeeding year     $1,875

Depreciation table for passenger automobiles (that are not trucks or vans) placed in service in calendar year 2011 for which the Sec 168(k) additional first year depreciation deduction does not apply:

1s tax year                           $3,060

2nd tax year                       $4,900

3rd tax year                        $2,950

Each succeeding year     $1,775

Depreciation table for trucks and vans placed in service in calendar year 2011 for which the Sec 168(k) additional first year depreciation does not apply:

1s tax year                           $3,260

2nd tax year                       $5,200

3rd tax year                        $3,150

Each succeeding year     $1,875

2011 Standard Mileage Rates

Voiture automobile, Luchon

Look out, the IRS announced the new mileage rates for 2011.  Read on for more information.

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today issued the 2011 optional standard mileage rates used to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile for business, charitable, medical or moving purposes.

Beginning on Jan. 1, 2011, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car (also vans, pickups or panel trucks) will be:

  • 51 cents per mile for business miles driven
  • 19 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes
  • 14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations

The standard mileage rate for business is based on an annual study of the fixed and variable costs of operating an automobile. The rate for medical and moving purposes is based on the variable costs as determined by the same study. Independent contractor Runzheimer International conducted the study.

A taxpayer may not use the business standard mileage rate for a vehicle after using any depreciation method under the Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS) or after claiming a Section 179 deduction for that vehicle. In addition, the business standard mileage rate cannot be used for any vehicle used for hire or for more than four vehicles used simultaneously.

Taxpayers always have the option of calculating the actual costs of using their vehicle rather than using the standard mileage rates.

Revenue Procedure 2010-51 contains additional details regarding the standard mileage rates.

IRS Patrol: 2010 Depreciation Limitations For Owners Of Passenger Automobiles

Revenue Procedure 2010-18 provides the depreciation deduction limitations for owners of passenger automobiles first placed in service, and amounts to be included in income by lessees of passenger automobiles first leased, during calendar year 2010.  This revenue procedure includes tables detailing these depreciation limitations and lessee inclusion amounts that reflect the automobile price inflation adjustments required by § 280F(d)(7) of the Internal Revenue Code.

Revenue Procedure 2010-18 will be published in Internal Revenue Bulletin 2010-9 on March 1, 2010.

IRS Presents: Eight Facts about the New Vehicle Sales and Excise Tax Deduction

If you bought a new vehicle in 2009, you may be entitled to a special tax deduction for the sales and excise taxes on your purchase.

Here are eight important facts the Internal Revenue Service wants you to know about this deduction:

  1. State and local sales and excise taxes paid on up to $49,500 of the purchase price of each qualifying vehicle are deductible.
  2. Qualified motor vehicles generally include new cars, light trucks, motor homes and motorcycles.
  3. To qualify for the deduction, the new cars, light trucks and motorcycles must weigh 8,500 pounds or less. New motor homes are not subject to the weight limit.
  4. Purchases must occur after Feb. 16, 2009, and before Jan. 1, 2010.
  5. Purchases made in states without a sales tax — such as Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Montana, New Hampshire and Oregon — may also qualify for the deduction. Taxpayers in these states may be entitled to deduct other qualifying fees or taxes imposed by the state or local government. The fees or taxes that qualify must be assessed on the purchase of the vehicle and must be based on the vehicle’s sales price or as a per unit fee.
  6. This deduction can be taken regardless of whether the buyers itemize their deductions or choose the standard deduction. Taxpayers who do not itemize will add this additional amount to the standard deduction on their 2009 tax return.
  7. The amount of the deduction is phased out for taxpayers whose modified adjusted gross income is between $125,000 and $135,000 for individual filers and between $250,000 and $260,000 for joint filers.
  8. Taxpayers who do not itemize must complete Schedule L, Standard Deduction for Certain Filers to claim the deduction.

For more information about these rules and other eligibility requirements visit IRS.gov/recovery.

Links:

YouTube Video:

Is Your Employer Provided Auto Creating a Tax Problem for You?

By Stacie Clifford Kitts, CPA

Do you have an employer provided automobile? If so, here are some things to know.

The law provides that the personal use of an employer-provided automobile represents additional compensation to an employee. This compensation is also known as a taxable fringe benefit.

Many employees are surprised to learn that when you use a business vehicle to commute to and from work or for any other personal use, you are generating additional taxable income that will be included on your W2.

No, sorry you did not get an unexpected raise. This portion of our tax code is just another example of how nothing in life is free. Not even an innocent trip to the park, or maybe that parent teacher conference – at least not if you got there in the company car.

Anyway, since this additional income along with the appropriate payroll taxes is determined annually by your employer, it is important that you carefully document your business versus personal use of the vehicle. After all, there is no need to pay more tax than is necessary. At a minimum, you should maintain a daily log that shows the miles you have driven, the business purpose for your trip, and where you were going.

You may also want to discuss the need for additional income tax withholding with your CPA or qualified tax preparer to make sure there are no tax surprises during tax filing time.

Now, the calculation of the income element for your visit to that parent teacher conference or other personal trips can be based on a couple of methods. Your employer may choose any one of the following to calculate your taxable personal use:

Cents-Per-Mile Rule
Your employer will multiply the total miles you used the vehicle for personal use by the standard mileage rate.
In order to use this method certain requirements must be met. You can check out the details of this method in Publication 15-B Employer’s Tax Guide to Fringe Benefits.

Lease Value Rule
If your employer uses this method, your employer will determine the percentage of personal use by dividing the total miles driven by the amount of personal miles driven. The resulting personal use percentage will then be multiplied by the vehicles “lease value.” The IRS provides the Annual Lease Value table that will be used in this calculation. Additional calculation information can be found at Publication 15-B.

Commuting Rule
If your employer provides a vehicle for the purposes of commuting such as a commuter vanpool, the taxable benefit is calculated by “multiplying each one-way commute by $1.50.”

One final note for S corporation shareholders who receive a W2 and who have a company vehicle, if at any time during the year you owned more than 2% of the outstanding stock of your S-Corp you are treated like a partner and not an employee in regards to the application of these rules. Check with your CPA or tax preparer for more information.

2010 Mileage Rates

[Stacie says: If you had any doubt that we are in the midst of a recession, this announcement of the 2010 mileage rates should clear that up for you.]

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today issued the 2010 optional standard mileage rates used to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile for business, charitable, medical or moving purposes.

Beginning on Jan. 1, 2010, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car (also vans, pickups or panel trucks) will be:

50 cents per mile for business miles driven

16.5 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes

14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations

The new rates for business, medical and moving purposes are slightly lower than last year’s. The mileage rates for 2010 reflect generally lower transportation costs compared to a year ago.

The standard mileage rate for business is based on an annual study of the fixed and variable costs of operating an automobile. The rate for medical and moving purposes is based on the variable costs as determined by the same study. Independent contractor Runzheimer International conducted the study.

A taxpayer may not use the business standard mileage rate for a vehicle after using any depreciation method under the Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System (MACRS) or after claiming a Section 179 deduction for that vehicle. In addition, the business standard mileage rate cannot be used for any vehicle used for hire or for more than four vehicles used simultaneously.

Taxpayers always have the option of calculating the actual costs of using their vehicle rather than using the standard mileage rates.

Revenue Procedure 2009-54 contains additional details regarding the standard mileage rates.

Guidance – Taxpayers May Rely on Manufacturer’s Certification Qualified Plug-in Electric Vehicle

Notice 2009-89 sets forth a process that allows manufacturers to certify to the Internal Revenue Service that a particular vehicle meets the requirements of § 30D of the Internal Revenue Code. Taxpayers purchasing such vehicles can rely on the domestic manufacturer’s (or, in the case of a foreign manufacturer, its domestic distributor’s) certification that both a particular make, model, and model year of vehicle qualifies as a plug-in electric drive motor vehicle under § 30D, and the amount of the credit allowable with respect to the vehicle. The notice also defines when the amended § 30D is effective.
Notice 2009-89 will appear in IRB 2009-48, dated November 30, 2009.

Purchase a Car in 2009 – Get a Sales Tax Deduction – There’s Still Time

WASHINGTON — With 2010 models arriving in dealer showrooms, the Internal Revenue Service reminds taxpayers that purchasing a new car, light truck, motor home or motorcycle could qualify them for a special deduction for the state and local sales and excise taxes on their 2009 tax returns.

Purchases made before Jan. 1, 2010, will qualify for this deduction under the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA).

The deduction is limited to the sales and excise taxes and similar fees paid on up to $49,500 of the purchase price of a new vehicle. The deduction is reduced for joint filers with modified adjusted gross incomes (MAGI) between $250,000 and $260,000 and other taxpayers with MAGI between $125,000 and $135,000. Taxpayers with higher incomes do not qualify.
Taxpayers who make qualifying new vehicle purchases this year can estimate the deduction with the help of Worksheet 10 in IRS Publication 919, How Do I Adjust My Withholding? Lines 10a to 10k of the worksheet show how to take into account purchases above the $49,500 limit, as well as the reduced deductions for taxpayers at higher income levels.

The special deduction is available regardless of whether taxpayers itemize deductions on their returns. Taxpayers who do not itemize will add this additional amount to the standard deduction on their 2009 tax return.

For those that have questions about the deduction for sales tax and other fees, these questions and answers might help. A video on the IRS Youtube.com channel and audio podcasts in English and Spanish are also available to help taxpayers take full advantage of the deduction.

Did You Purchase a New Car This Year? – Here Are Some Facts about the New Vehicle Sales and Excise Tax Deduction

[Stacie says: Here are some great tips from the IRS if you purchased a new car this year.]

Taxpayers who buy new motor vehicles this year may be entitled to a special tax deduction for the sales or excise taxes on those purchases when they file their 2009 federal tax returns next year. This tax break is part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

Taxpayers in states that do not have state sales taxes may be entitled to deduct other fees or taxes imposed by the state or local government.
Here are nine important facts the IRS wants you to know about the deduction.
State and local sales and excise taxes paid on up to $49,500 of the purchase price of each qualifying vehicle are deductible.

Qualified motor vehicles generally include new cars, light trucks, motor homes and motorcycles.

To qualify for the deduction, the new cars, light trucks and motorcycles must weigh 8,500 pounds or less. Motor homes are not subject to the weight limit.

Purchases must occur after Feb. 16, 2009, and before Jan. 1, 2010.

Taxpayers who purchase new motor vehicles in states that do not have state sales taxes may be entitled to deduct other fees or taxes assessed on the purchase of those vehicles. Fees or taxes that qualify must be based on the vehicles’ sales price or as a per unit fee. These states include Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Montana, New Hampshire and Oregon.

Taxpayers who purchase qualified motor vehicles may claim the deduction when they file their 2009 tax return in 2010.

The deduction may not be taken on 2008 tax returns.

This deduction can be taken regardless of whether the buyers itemize their deductions or choose the standard deduction.Taxpayers who do not itemize will add this additional amount to the standard deduction on their 2009 tax return.

The amount of the deduction is phased out for taxpayers whose modified adjusted gross income is between $125,000 and $135,000 for individual filers and between $250,000 and $260,000 for joint filers.

For more information on this and other key tax provisions of the Recovery Act visit the official IRS Website at IRS.gov.

Links:
Sales Tax Deduction for Vehicle Purchases
YouTube Video: Vehicle Tax Deduction
Audio File for Podcast – ARRA Vehicle Tax Deduction: English Spanish
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009: Information Center

Tax Breaks Available for Taxpayers Who Purchase Qualified Plug-In Electric Vehicles

WASHINGTON — Plug-in electric vehicles using certain types of batteries may qualify for a new tax credit if purchased this year, the Internal Revenue Service said today.
The Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (EESA) and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) created two new tax credits for various types of electric vehicles, which may include what are commonly referred to as neighborhood electric vehicles.
ARRA creates a tax credit for low-speed or two- or three-wheel electric vehicles, such as motor scooters, purchased after Feb. 17, 2009, and before Jan. 1, 2012. The amount of the credit is 10 percent of the cost of the vehicle, up to a maximum credit of $2,500. To qualify, a vehicle must be either a low-speed vehicle that is propelled to a significant extent by a rechargeable battery with a capacity of at least 4 kilowatt hours or be a two- or three-wheeled vehicle that is propelled to a significant extent by a rechargeable battery with a capacity of at least 2.5 kilowatt hours.
EESA created a tax credit for vehicles that have at least four wheels and draw propulsion using a rechargeable traction battery with at least four kilowatt hours of capacity. For 2009, the minimum credit is $2,500 and the credit tops out at $7,500 to $15,000, depending on the weight of the vehicle and the capacity of the battery.
During 2009, low-speed, four-wheeled vehicles manufactured primarily for use on public streets, roads and highways (neighborhood electric vehicles) may qualify both for the EESA credit and, if purchased after February 17, 2009, for the ARRA credit for low-speed electric vehicles. A taxpayer may not claim both credits for the same vehicle. Vehicles manufactured primarily for off-road use, such as for use on a golf course, do not qualify for either credit.
The Internal Revenue Service is working on guidance regarding certification procedures for both of these credits.

Facts About The New Sales Tax Deduction For Vehicle Purchases

Facts about the New Sales Tax Deduction for Vehicle Purchases
Taxpayers who buy a new car or several other types of motor vehicles this year may be entitled to a special tax deduction when they file their 2009 federal tax returns next year. The tax break is part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.
Here are seven things you should know about this new deduction:
State and local sales taxes paid on up to $49,500 of the purchase price of qualifying vehicles are deductible.
Qualified motor vehicles generally include new (not used) cars, light trucks, motor homes and motorcycles.
Purchases must occur after Feb. 16, 2009, and before Jan. 1, 2010.
This deduction can be taken regardless of whether or not you itemize other deductions on your tax return.
Taxpayers will claim this deduction when filing their 2009 federal income tax return next year.
The amount of the deduction is phased out for taxpayers whose modified adjusted gross income is between $125,000 and $135,000 for individual filers and between $250,000 and $260,000 for joint filers.
The deduction may not be taken on 2008 tax returns.
Consumers who are considering buying a new car may find that this tax incentive means there may have never been a better time to buy.
——————————————————————————————- Note: Item above has been corrected to remove an erroneous reference to this being an “above-the-line deduction.” (04/21/2009)

Tax Credit For Hybruds Begins to Phase-Out

WASHINGTON — The tax credit for hybrid passenger automobiles and light trucks manufactured by Ford Motor Company has begun to phase out for purchases made after March 31, 2009.
Taxpayers may claim the full amount of the credit only on purchases made before April 1, 2009, because the total number of vehicles sold reached the 60,000 vehicle threshold in the last quarter of 2008.
The cumulative sales of qualified Ford hybrid vehicles sold from the period of Jan. 1, 2006, to Dec. 31, 2008 is 66,157.
For vehicles purchased for use or lease on or after April 1, 2009, and on or before Sept. 30, 2009, the credit is 50 percent of the full amount. For vehicles purchased for use or lease on or after Oct. 1, 2009, and on or before March 31, 2010, the credit is 25 percent of the full amount. For vehicles purchased for use or lease on or after April 1, 2010, no credit is allowable.
The full credit amount for vehicle purchases made prior to April 1, 2009 is:
2005, 2006, 2007 Ford Escape 2WD, $2,600;
2008, 2009 Ford Escape 2WD, $3,000;
2005, 2006, 2007, 2009 Ford Escape 4WD, $1,950;
2008 Ford Escape 4WD, $2,200;
2010 Ford Fusion, $3,400;
2008, 2009 Mercury Mariner 2WD, $3,000;
2006, 2007, 2009 Mercury Mariner 4WD, $1,950;
2008 Mercury Mariner 4WD, $2,200;
2010 Mercury Milan, $3,400

Related link:
N-2009-37 – Phase-out of Credit for New Qualified Hybrid Motor Vehicles and New Advanced Lean Burn Technology Motor Vehicles

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